EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR FOOT SURGERY

Foot surgery needs to be carried out if a person’s bone has been dislocated or if the injury is quite serious. Gordon Slater is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery, primarily in the correction of bunions. He has extensive experience in orthopedic trauma. His special interests include ankle surgery, arthroscopy, and sports injuries, and foot surgery. If you have to go in for surgery, here are a few things that you should know.

By whom should I get surgery?

The best person to judge surgical results is your doctor, who regularly sees the patient’s surgery and has a clear idea about the surgeon. Many patients also come “by word of mouth” advised by a satisfied friend.

  • How much will it cost me?

The operation is fully supported with regard to social security. Nevertheless, the majority of the surgeons are in free fees and can ask you an overflow of fees, possibly refunded by your mutual, with an invoice. This should be clearly stated before the intervention.

Do I have to see the anesthetist?

The consultation is mandatory even if the patient leaves the same day, even if the anesthesia is not general. It must be between one month before and three days before the operation. Anesthesia can be general, locoregional by epidural, see local by a gesture behind the knee. The anesthesiologist will offer the patient the choice, as long as his medical record allows it.

What should I bring for the procedure?

Apart from the usual toiletries, in the case of hallux valgus and claw toe, think of bringing crutches and a special walking shoe if the surgeon has prescribed it, as well as X-rays.

For Morton’s syndrome, however, special walking shoes are not useful.

What is the duration of hospitalization?

Depending on the planned surgical procedure, the surgeon’s habits, the patient’s social context, the duration can range from a few hours to 2 to 3 days for the hallux valgus. For claw toe and Morton syndrome, it is most often a few hours as part of outpatient surgery.

When are you going to walk?

In principle, from the intervention, walking is possible with or without special shoe depending on the type of intervention, the habits of the surgeon, and the resistance of the bone. It is essential in all cases to raise the limb well to fight against edema when you are not standing. Crutches can be helpful.

Reference:
https://beforeitsnews.com/healthcare/2020/02/everything-you-need-to-know-about-surgery-2539320.html

Like this article?

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on Linkdin
Share on pinterest
Share on Pinterest

Dr. Gordon Slater

Dr. Slater is one of the first foot and ankle surgeons in Australia to adopt minimally invasive surgical techniques. He routinely uses MIS to treat a range of conditions, including bunions.

Leave a comment

Dr Gordon Slater is a highly-skilled surgeon specialising in foot and ankle conditions and sports injuries. Dr Slater is one of the first foot and ankle surgeons in Australia to adopt minimally invasive surgical techniques. He routinely uses MIS to treat a range of conditions, including bunions. MIS  has many advantages including shorter operating times, reduced post-operative pain, reduced risk of infection, minimal scarring and better cosmetic outcomes.

Copyright © 2022 orthopaedic-surgeon.com.au